Alice, Jan. 21st Pet of the Week!

Who says only bunnies have floppy ears? Well, go ask Alice! Alice is a sweet 4-year-old pitty who loves nothing more than to lean on a human for love—and boy, do a lot of us need that these days! Alice is up for any type of fun and will gladly follow you down any rabbit hole. Because the shelter is closed to the public, adoption appointments are conducted through appointment, so call 562-570-PETS or email PetAdopt@longbeach.gov to meet Alice. Ask for ID#A653043.

(This rescue encouraged by the usual suspects.)

Should you let your dog jump on a bed or not?

As soon as you add a new four-legged friend to your family, you will find that it has a special attraction for your bed. Even if you don’t let your dog into bed, you can often find that your pet was lying in it while you were gone to work. So, anyway, whether you let your dog lie in bed or not – the pet still jumps on it to chill. But should you let it do it? That’s the question. While this may seem like a trivial and even funny topic, it needs to be discussed if you just want your dog to be healthy and happy.

Your dog can get injured. This is the first reason you should not let your dog jump on the bed. Whether the dog is jumping from a lower surface to a higher one or vice versa, there remains a risk to twist or strain. Although a dog that underestimates its capabilities can be injured by jumping from one surface to another anywhere, the bed is a particularly dangerous object due to its soft surface. Jumping from a soft to a hard surface, or vice versa, sooner or later ends in injury.

Jumping is not good for a pet’s joints. Although jumping is a natural move for a dog, their joins definitely get an increased load for this action. How high the load on the joints also depends on the size of the dog breed. Jumping on your bed for a big dog can be a laugh. Meanwhile, for a dog of a small breed, it can be a height that requires special muscle and joint strength to overcome.

Greater risk of developing arthritis. Researchers also note that dog jumping is directly linked to the development of arthritis. Sad statistics show that 60 % of dogs develop arthritis – a painful illness that get worse with age – in their lifetime. Although it is a disease that is more common in old dogs, it can be hazardous for younger ones as well. Especially if their joints are under heavy load due to frequent jumping.

Who is the boss? You have to remember that you are responsible for your dog and knowing that it is detrimental to his health, you can shape the rules accordingly. Jumping is a natural instinct, so your dog will jump out of joy when you see or play. You don’t need to forbid your dog from doing so. Still, unnecessary jumping such as jumping on the bed or couch can be avoided for sure. But how to do that?

Possible solutions. Not letting your dog jump on the bed is not the same as letting him lie on the bed. Therefore, the easiest way to both protect your dog’s health and make life easier for him is to just get a dog ramp. They come in a variety of types, sizes as well as designs. Therefore a dog ramps manufacturer will be happy to help you to find the perfect one for your home.

Ollie, Jan. 14th Pet of the Week!

Everyone needs a cat like Ollie in their life! “Curious,” “affectionate” and “happy” best describe this 2-year-old Creamsicle, and we can also add “eager.” He loves human companionship, and if he so much senses someone approaching, he’s up on his hind legs to rub against a hand, have some playtime, or gently accept a treat. Ready to take him home? Because the shelter is closed to the public, adoption appointments are conducted through email, so contact PetAdopt@longbeach.gov to meet Ollie. Ask for ID A653056.

(This rescue encouraged by the usual suspects.)

Napoleon, Jan. 7th Pet of the Week!

The French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte was a shrewd military personage who built an empire with his skills. Unlike Bonaparte, though, our Napoleon resembles the sweet, custardy dessert of the same name, and he’ll delight you just as much as that gooey goody does. No calories to worry about—this 1-year-old pitty mix is energetic and playful and will lead you through the routines, only to settle down later for some love. Want your heart blown apart (heh heh)? Take a Napoleon home! Because the shelter is closed to the public, adoption appointments are conducted through appointment, so call 562-570-PETS or email PetAdopt@longbeach.gov  to meet Napoleon. Ask for ID#652588.

(This rescue encouraged by the usual suspects.)

Xena, Dec. 30th Pet of the Week!

Xena is a 5-year-old sweetheart of a Rottweiler. She has special needs—she’s blind—but the emphasis is on “special.” Xena’s a lovebug with her bright smile and easygoing disposition—just what’s needed for the new year! Here she is with her seeing-eye human, shelter volunteer Gary. Want to be her eyes? She sure will be your heart! Because the shelter is closed to the public, adoption appointments are conducted through appointment, so call 562-570-PETS or email PetAdopt@longbeach.gov to meet Xena. Ask for ID#A652438.

(This rescue encouraged by the usual suspects.)

Domino, Dec. 22nd Pet of the Week!

It’s nearly Christmas, with New Year’s Eve following close behind, and here’s Domino, all dressed in his proper tuxedo and white silk cravat. He’s all dressed up with nowhere to go. You can fix that—this handsome guy’s holiday wish is to find his furever home. Domino’s only 2 years old, and he’s easygoing, gentle and loving—just what you need to warm up your holiday. Because the shelter is closed to the public, adoption appointments are conducted through email, so contact PetAdopt@longbeach.gov to meet Domino. Ask for ID#A652285.

(This rescue encouraged by the usual suspects.)

Dobby, Dec. 17th Pet of the Week!

Even though the poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” commonly known as “’Twas the Night Before Christmas,” describes Mr. Claus as “a right jolly old elf,” Dobby looks anything but. Named for the beloved house elf in the Harry Potter series, Dobby looks as if he’s muttering “Bah, humbug!” Don’t let that fool you. This blue-eyed 7-year-old, who came to the shelter as a stray, is a true man cat and craves love, attention and maybe a sock—stuffed with catnip! Because the shelter is closed to the public, adoption appointments are conducted through email, so contact PetAdopt@longbeach.gov to meet Dobby. Ask for ID#651055.

(This rescue encouraged by the usual suspects.)

Clark, Dec. 10th Pet of the Week!

Clark was found strolling the streets of Long Beach when he was brought in to the shelter. At his advanced age—10 years old—and his friendly disposition, we’re pretty sure he was someone’s cat. He’s got to have that job again—he deserves it. Because the shelter is closed to the public, adoption appointments are conducted through email, so contact PetAdopt@longbeach.gov to meet Cleo. Ask for ID#A618818.

(This rescue encouraged by the usual suspects.)